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  • What Species Do We Have in our Area? 60 species of mosquito live in NC, however, the imported Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes Albopictus, is the major vector that we battle here in Wake County.
  • How Do I Control Mosquitoes Myself? Empty out any standing water at least once a week, for instance in birdbaths. Remove old tires, toys, empty cans, etc., that can hold water. Clean out your gutters. If you and your neighbors remove breeding places, it is unlikely that you will need our service.
  • How Long is the Mosquito Season Here? Mosquito season typically runs from mid-April to late October in Wake County. Adult mosquitoes can survive temperatures down to 24F. It is unlikely that you will encounter them after we have a few nights in the 40’s.
  • Does Summer Heat Affect Mosquitoes? Mosquitoes become more active the hotter it gets, however, temperatures above 104F will kill adults. Prolonged drought also helps control them.
  • What Diseases do Mosquitoes Carry? Of major concern in North Carolina are Heartworm, Malaria, Dengue Fever, Zika, and La Crosse encephalitis. Aedes Albopictus is a vector for many other diseases, including yellow fever and Chikungunya fever. In NC there were 35 cases of malaria, 1 case of dengue, 12 cases of Zika, and 9 cases of La Crosse encephalitis. There were over 20,000 cases of heartworm infection in dogs in North Carolina; NC is the 7th worst state for heartworm incidence.
  • How Far do Asian Tiger Mosquitoes Fly? Asian Tiger Mosquitoes are considered weak fliers, typically flying no more than 500 feet. 500 feet, however, is plenty far enough to fly from your neighbor’s stagnant birdbath or pond to your backyard.
  • Where do Asian Tiger Mosquitoes Hang Out? Mostly in low shrubs and dark damp places, such as under decks. Asian Tiger Mosquitoes don’t typically fly higher than 12 feet.
  • How Do Mosquitoes Find Us? Mosquitoes can see, hear, smell, and sense heat and moisture. They smell the CO2 that we give off at a distance of 30-150 feet. They can see us at 15-30 feet. They sense our body heat and moisture at 8 inches.
  • How Did Aedes Albopictus get here? Asian Tiger Mosquitoes were imported to the United States in shipments of used tires from Asia in 1985. So please get rid of those old tires! Or at least drill holes in them so that they don’t hold water.
  • If you have any questions or other facts about mosquitoes, especially Aedes Albopictus, that you would like to see included on this page, please email me jon@organicmosquito.com
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